Monday, June 10, 2013

Hot and sour rhubarb pork and noodles


I think I've made an amazing discovery with this dish: rhubarb is awesome in savory dishes and is the perfect sour component to an Asian-inspired sauce. Wow. Just wow. This sauce was fantastic. This is yet another recipe inspired by Jamie Oliver's Jamie at Home. I modified it a bit to make less and to use some ingredients I had on hand. I also discovered that the recipe needed a little tweaking for our tastes to ensure that we didn't end up with a pile of stuck together noodles, which was starting to happen! The flavors in this dish are so good and very intense. I topped it with scallions, radishes, mint, and cilantro - I think that daikon radish, savoy cabbage, and other herbs would also be delicious toppings. I also enlisted the assistance of the slow cooker for this recipe because I didn't want to be using the oven (too hot). Below is my modified recipe that will serve two-three people (or make some really tasty leftovers).


Hot and sour rhubarb pork with noodles
about 1.5 lbs. of boneless pork shoulder or pork roast, cut into 1-inch cubes
1-1/2 cups roughly chopped rhubarb
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 jalapeno, roughly chopped (remove seeds for lower heat)
1/2 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
coconut oil, for frying
1 lb. fresh Asian style noodles (or any long flat noodle)
2 scallions, thinly sliced
3-4 radishes, thinly sliced
cilantro, roughly chopped
mint, thinly sliced
lime wedges

Trim away any excess fat on the pork cubes and place it in a slow cooker. Add the rhubarb through five-spice powder to a food processor and puree until smooth. Stir into the pork. Cook on low for 5-6 hours.

When the pork is tender and cooked, remove it from the slow cooker using a slotted spoon and transfer to a plate. Leave the lid off the slow cooker and turn it up to high to thicken the rhubarb sauce.

Heat about two tablespoons of coconut oil in a wok or heavy bottom skillet. Add the pork and cook, stirring often, until it is browned and slightly crispy.

In the meantime, cook the noodles in salted boiling water. Fresh noodles will only take a few minutes to cook (it will take longer if you are using dried). When they are al dente, drain, return to the pot, and stir in a couple tablespoons of the rhubarb sauce to keep the noodles from sticking.

Place a couple scoops of noodles on each plate. Top with the pork, scallions, radishes, cilantro, and mint. Serve with extra rhubarb sauce and lime wedges.


What was I cooking one year ago?: strawberry spoonbread with vanilla cream
Two years ago?: potato and Swiss chard hash with eggs
Three?: Thai green curry

14 comments:

  1. I am a huge pork fan!! love the combination of flavors and texture here! Delicious dish!

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  2. I hardly ever see rhubarb used in savory recipes! It sounds like it fit right in perfectly - I love fruit paired with pork!

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  3. I love the idea of using rhubarb in this pork dish...very clever! Sounds really tasty Amy.
    Thanks for the recipe and have a great week :D

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  4. I can almost never get rice noodles to NOT stick together...so I love your method for combating it here! And rhubarb in savory dishes always makes my head turn!

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  5. Rhubarb! What a unique way to use it :) This looks lovely, love the radishes too.

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  6. I love rhubarb but have only tried it in desserts...until now:)
    This dish looks so appetizing, it's already on my to do list.
    Thank you, Amy!

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  7. I love your use of rhubarb in this recipe! Looks wonderful!

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  8. The pictures have my mouth watering! I don't think I've ever had rhubarb with pork but I can imagine how good this is!

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  9. Ooh, this noodle dish looks great!

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  10. That's a really unqiue noodle with special flavours. Look delicious!

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  11. What a great idea to pair rhubarb with pork, cutting right through the fattiness of the meat. I'll be trying this, although I think I'll have to have rhubarb for dessert too as I love it so much!

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  12. Looks like a great and flavorful noodle dish!

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  13. I've had rhubarb in savory dishes, but not often. This looks terrific! I can see how the flavor works so well with the pork. Really inspired - thanks for this.

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  14. Wow, I never thought of using rhubarb in savoury dishes before. Usually I add a tonne of sugar to it to make it palatable and then have it with ice cream. Must try this in the future!

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